“The human body is the best work of art.” ― Jess C. Scott

Few things are as complex and interesting to us as our own bodies. We each only have one, and it’s supported by thousands of parts working in union. Understanding the pieces that make us who we are and how they work together is cool!

  • An adult human being is made of approximately 7,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000 atoms. Obviously, this varies based on the size of the person and their body composition.

 

  • A human baby has 99 more bones than an adult. A baby’s skeleton is mostly made up of cartilage. As a person grows up, most of this cartilage turns into bone in a process called ossification, and the ossification process results in the joining of certain bones. ConsequenCute-Baby-1.jpgtly, new born babies have around 305 bones, while an adult has just 206 bones.

 

 

  • Humans shed about 600,000 particles of skin every hour. In fact, most of the dust underneath your bed is probably your own dead skin.
  • There are 100,000 miles of blood vessels in an adult human body. The largest blood vessel is the aorta, which is just over an inch in diameter.
  • In a lifetime, an average person produces about 25,000 quarts of saliva, enough to Saliva-Baby.jpgfill two swimming pools. We also produce about a litre of mucus per day.

 

 

  • Your body has enough iron in it to forge a 3-inches-long nail. You also have enough sulfur to kill all fleas on an average dog, enough carbon to make 900 pencils, enough potassium to fire a toy cannon, enough fat to make 7 bars of soap, enough phosphorous to make 2,200 match heads, and enough water to fill a ten-gallon tank.

 

  • We all have tiny mites living in our eyelashes. These little mites actually aren’t too choosey; they’ll live anywhere as long as they have access hair follicles. They’re found on other parts of the body and on a host of other mammals.Eyelashes
  • Sweat itself is odorless. It’s the bacteria on the skin that mingles with it and produces body odor. Bacteria that are naturally present on our skin thrive in sweaty regions.

  • Similar to fingerprints, everyone also has a unique tongue print. It may be some time before your local police station starts taking tongue prints, but research on the required 3-D imaging technology is already being developed and tested.
  • If the human eye was a digital camera it would have 576 megapixels. Currently, the most expensive digital camera in the world has 200 megapixels.
  • All of the bacteria in our body collectively weighs about 4 pounds. That’s enough to fill a big soup can. In fact, there are more bacteria in your mouth than there are people in the world.

  • If uncoiled, the DNA in all of your body’s cells would stretch 10 billion miles, which is long enough to reach from here to Pluto and back.

  • Within three days of death, the enzymes that once digested your dinner begin to eat you. Ruptured cells will become food for the bacteria in your gut, which will release enough noxious gas to bloat your body and force your eyes to bulge outward.
  • In a lifetime, your brain’s long-term memory can hold up to 1 quadrillion (1 million billion) bits of information.
  • The gastrointestinal tract is a 30-foot tube that runs from your mouth to your anus. There’s a few moving parts, but a long story short is that food comes in and poop goes out.

  • Your heart will pump about 1.5 million barrels of blood during your lifetime. That’s enough to fill 200 train tank cars.
  • As long as it has an oxygen supply, your heart can keep beating even if it’s separated from the body because it has its own electrical impulse.
  • Half of your genes describe the complex design of your brain, with the other half describing the organization of the other 98% of your body.